Upon studying the concept of the Gerber Convention, it becomes quite evident to all bridge players, that the convention itself has one feature, which is lacking. The use of the 4 Clubs bid as Ace or Key Card-asking means that the 4 Clubs bid can not be used as a natural bid or as a cuebid. Super Gerber was devised to overcome this disadvantage.

Originator - Developer

This Ace-asking conventional modification was devised by Mr. Robert Goldman (Bobby), born November 10, 1938 and died May 15, 1998, and lived in Highland Village, Texas, United States. The photograph below was taken in the year 1978.

     

Fundamental Concept

The fundamental concept behind the Super Gerber conventional method is the fact that the bridge player can use any suit bid between 4 Clubs and 5 Clubs inclusive to inquire about the number of held Aces.

Super Gerber can be applied in the bidding auction when both partners have agreed to play in a Minor suit, or when, in the bidding auction, the last bid is 3 No Trump. One of these two conditions must exist before Super Gerber takes effect.

After one partner has bid 3 No Trump or a Minor suit has been established as the trump suit, Super Gerber is initiated with a bid of four of the lowest unbid suit. The examples, which follow, should illustrate the use of the Super Gerber convention more than written explanations.

In the following bidding sequence:

Opener Responder Meaning
1 1
3 NT 4 Lowest unbid suit equals Super Gerber.
  4 This bid is considered natural.

In the following bidding sequence:

Opener Responder Meaning
1 1
3 NT 4 Lowest unbid suit equals Super Gerber.

In the following bidding sequence:

Opener Responder Meaning
1 1
3 NT 4 Lowest unbid suit equals Super Gerber.
  4 This bid is considered natural.

Note: In the first and last of the three examples, a rebid of 4 Clubs by the responder would be considered a natural bid.

Distinction Between Responses

In the following bidding sequence the response of 4 Clubs is a natural bid:

Opener   Responder Meaning
1   2
2   3
3 NT 4 A natural rebid.

In the following bidding sequence the response of 5 Clubs becomes a Super Gerber bid:

Opener   Responder Meaning
1   2
2   3
3 NT 5 This rebid now becomes Super Gerber.

The partnership agreement is that 5 Clubs is, in this bidding sequence, not a natural bid, but rather Super Gerber. This is obvious since the responder jumped one level to initiate Super Gerber.

When both partners agree on a Minor suit fit, Super Gerber can also be employed by bidding four of the lowest ranking unbid suit.

In the bidding example:

Opener Responder Meaning
1 3
4 This rebid now becomes Super Gerber; the lowest ranking unbid suit

In the bidding sequence:

Opener Responder Meaning
1 3
4 This rebid now becomes Super Gerber, the lowest ranking unbid suit

In the bidding sequence:

Opener   Responder Meaning
1   2
2 NT   3
4 This rebid now becomes Super Gerber, the lowest ranking unbid suit

By using a series of step responses, the number of Aces can be determined.

First Step shows: 0 or 4 Aces
Second Step shows: 1 Ace
Third Step shows: 2 Aces
Fourth Step shows: 3 Aces

As with the Blackwood conventional method, the Super Gerber conventional method can be used also to ask for the number of Kings by rebidding the Super Gerber suit.

In the following bidding sequence:

Opener   Responder   Meaning
1       Promises opening values.
    2   Per partnership agreement this is a strong jump shift showing at least a 6-card Diamond suit.
2 NT       The opener limits his holding, but does not deny Diamond support.
    3   The responder now shows a 7-card plus Diamond suit.
4       This bid is Super Gerber asking for the number of Aces according to the response method described above. The opener implies that the trump suit is Diamonds.
    5   For example, this response to Super Gerber would be the third step response, and would promise 2 Aces.
5       The implied trump suit of Diamonds is excluded in the King-asking inquiry. The responses are also according to the step responses outlined above. The King-asking inquiry guarantees that all four Aces are held by the partnership.
    5   Shows 0 or 4 Kings.
    5 NT   Shows 1 King.
    6   Shows 2 Kings.
    6   Shows 3 Kings.

The opener, by a 6 Diamonds response, has the option to pass if not all Aces and Kings are accounted for, but the opener also has the option of bidding the grand slam of 7 Diamonds or 7 No Trump.

Additional Notes

As with all other conventions, the Super Gerber convention has its flaws, especially when all suits have been bid. Under these circumstances, the partnership agreement is that a bid of 5 Clubs is then Super Gerber. However, if one partner decides to ask for Kings, then the bid is 6 Clubs. This leads to a certain ambiguity, and the partnership agreement may not be clear. There must be a partnership understanding regarding this situation.

 

 

If you wish to include this feature, or any other feature, of the game of bridge in your partnership agreement, then please make certain that the concept is understood by both partners. Be aware whether or not the feature is alertable or not and whether an announcement should or must be made. Check with the governing body and/or the bridge district and/or the bridge unit prior to the game to establish the guidelines applied. Please include the particular feature on your convention card in order that your opponents are also aware of this feature during the bidding process, since this information must be made known to them according to the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge. We do not always include the procedure regarding Alerts and/or Announcements, since these regulations are changed and revised during time by the governing body. It is our intention only to present the information as concisely and as accurately as possible.

 


     
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