NABC
This is an abbreviation for the North American Bridge Championships which are operated annually by the ACBL. These tournaments are scheduled in the spring, summer and fall and are rotated around the United States and Canada. Each NABC offers events for all levels of players and features the NABC+ events and an IN, or Intermediate-Newcomer, program for players with fewer than 300 masterpoints.

NABC+ or NABC-Plus Events
These are events and are the highest-rated championship events offered by ACBL. They are conducted at the three NABCx and are nationally-rated events with no upper masterpoint limit. The Player of the Year contest is won by the player winning the most platinum masterpoints in these events during the year.

NABC Master
A member who has at least 200 masterpoints recorded by ACBL, of which 50 must be pigmented, with at least 5 gold, 15 red or gold, and 25 silver.

NAC - North American Championships
There are three principal bridge tournaments of the American Contract Bridge League, which encompasses the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Bermuda. Prior to 1975 these events were known as the National Tournaments.

NABC Appeals Committee
This committee appointed at each North American Bridge Championship by the ACBL Board of Directors to hear appeals from rulings of individual directors or complaints as to conduct of ethics. The power and jurisdiction of this committee end with the end of the NABC tournament for which it was appointed.

Nagy Game Tries
This method of discovering whether game is a possibility after a one level raise of a Major suit, especially Spades, is worth exploring, was most likely devised by Mr. Peter I. Nagy.

NAMYATS
The original designation for this conventional method is Four Club and Four Diamond Opening Transfers. It is/was also known and referred to as Mitchell Transfers. This is because the developer of this particular conventional method is Mr. Victor Mitchell. The foundation of the conventional method is that a Minor suit opening bid on the four level is a transfer bid.

NAMYATS Defense Method
The conventional method of preempting on the four level presents largely any competition. This suggested method allows the competition to enter the auction on the four level.

Namyats - Defense Against Namyats
There are many forms of defense methods against any and all conventional methods. It would be impossible to introduce them all since they are normally based on a partnership agreement and/or understanding. We do wish to present any defense mechanisms whenever possible and whenever we find them.

Namyats Preempt Transfer Bids
A preemptive opening of 4 Clubs or 4 Diamonds indicating either of the two Major suits devised by Mr. Victor Mitchell.

NAP
An abbreviation for the North American Pairs, which was formerly conducted as the Grand National Pairs. This event is a major ACBL championship which is staged in qualifying rounds at the club, unit and district levels. It culminates in a final held in conjunction with the Spring NABC and is run as a flighted event.

Nasz System
This is a variation of the Polish Club System and which is played in a certain geographical location within the country. The name translates to Our System and is commonly referred to as Strefa, which translates as Zone. The link is to a .pdf file , and is only written in Polish Language. This information is written in a .pdf file format and will be automatically opened by your browser. Anyone wishing to translate this article, please send it to the BridgeGuys.

National
The highest tournament level within one country or geographical unit.

National Authority
The body which, in each country, has the responsibility for sponsoring and promoting bridge in that country.

National Laws Commission
A committee that administers the Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge in North America.

National 49er Pairs
The National 49er Pairs is a one-day Matchpoint Event, in which players compete for masterpoints and the Fifth Chair Trophy provided by the Fifth Chair Foundation. The National 49er Pairs is a limited to players with 0 to 50 Masterpoints. The first National 49er Pairs was conducted in 1998 at the 41st Spring North American Bridge Championship conducted in Reno, Nevada, between March 19 and March 29, 1998. See: Bulletin 8, Volume 41, Number 8, for Thursday, March 27, 1998, with Editiors Mr. Henry Francis and Jody Latham.

National 99er Pairs
This is a nationally-rated event for players with 0-99 masterpoints which is contested at the Fall NABC. It awards partial gold points.

National 199er Pairs
This is a nationally-rated event for players with 0-199 masterpoints which is contested at the Fall NABC. It awards partial gold points.

Nationals
This is the original designation for the NABCs. ACBL's three premier tournaments were next called the NACs, or the North American Championships, and then renamed the North American Bridge Championships, or NABCs, in the 1970s to better reflect the fact that ACBL is an organization, which represents four countries, which are the United States, Canada, Mexico and Bermuda.

National Tournament
A tournament which determines the winners of various events on a nationwide bases.

National Trump
The establishing by a governing body of a particular suit as trump at the game of Whist.

Nativity Scene
A colloquial term describing a holding containing three Kings. Also similar to the phrase I only held the three Magi.

Natural Calls
These are calls which reflect the nature and character of the hand and suggest a possible final contract. The reversal is called Artificial Calls. Some bids or calls, however, which have artificial meanings can be applied as natural bids.
1. indicating a desire to play at the current or named contract;
2. indicating a desire to play at the strain named but not necessarily at the level indicated.

Natural Responses
The origin of these responses is unknown. This conventional method, employed in responding to a strong, artificial 2 Clubs opening by partner, is completely natural except for the first response of 2 Diamonds, which is artificial and negative. As a result, all other responses by partner are natural and positive.

NCBO
National Contract Bridge Organization. A World Bridge Federation term for any independent or self-governing country with at least 250 bridge players.

Neapolitan
A system devised principally by Mr. Eugenio Chiaradia. It has been played successfully in many World Championships by Mr. Pietro Forquet, Mr. Guglielmo Siniscalco, Mr. Massimo D’Alelio and Mr. Benito Garozzo. However, since 1965, Mr. Benito Garozzo has gradually revised the Neapolitan and renamed it the Blue Team Club system.
See: Blue Team.

Neapolitan Club Opening Bids
These opening bids constituted in the early days of bridge the Italian principle bidding system and which became the foundation of the Italian Blue Team Club System and was replaced, which, in turn, was later replaced by the Blue Team Club System. See Blue Team Club Opening Bids.

Neapolitan Four Diamond Convention
A form of delayed game raise used in the Neapolitan System. It is a jump bid which applies when a forcing jump in the intended trump suit is not available. See: Blue Team Four Club-Four Diamond Convention.

Neapolitan Two Diamonds
See: Blue Team Two Diamond

Near-Solid Suit
A semi-solid suit missing perhaps one honor, such as Ace-King-Queen-Ten.

Nebulous One Diamond Opening
This conventional method was devised by Mr. Norman Coombs. This is an opening bid employed by several partnerships using the Precision Bidding System to indicate no biddable suit. The Diamond suit of the opener may be as short as two cards and sometimes may be only one card. See: Short Diamond.

Necessity Finesse
See: Finesse. This is a finesse, which is absolutely necessary in order to fulfill the contract. Without the execution of the finesse, the contract is doomed to failure.

NEC Sponsorship
At the 1989 World Championships in Perth, Australia, the World Bridge Federation decided to test corporate sponsorship of world championships in an effort to divert some of the costs of organizing bridge events. The sponsor is then permitted to promote the event with its name attached, such as the Nippon Electric Corporation sponsoring several NEC Championships like the NEC Bermuda Bowl and the NEC Venice Cup World Championships.

Negative
Denying strength or interest in a higher level contract.

Negative Double
Mr. Alvin Roth and Mr. Tobias Stone developed the Roth-Stone system, which included the negative double andwhich also defined the present day parameters of this particular double. The original designation was Sputnik, named for the Russian satellite launched by the Soviet Union October 4, 1957.

Negative Free Bid
A non-forcing suit bid by the responder over an intervening overcall when all other conventional and systemic bids or calls are not available to describe his holdings and values. For example, partner opens 1 Club and this is followed by an overcall of 1 Spade. You hold Hearts: AQ9876 and a side Queen in Diamonds. You do not have sufficient values to bid 2 Hearts using standard methods. The normal conclusion is to employ a Negative Double, planning to rebid Hearts, which under normal circumstances would show a 5-card Heart suit and less than the required 10 high card points. The rebid could become a problem if the Spades are raised. It also becomes problematic if the holding is: Diamonds: AQ9876 and a side Queen in Hearts. The Negative Double then becomes questionable.

The alternative is to have a partnership understanding that a Negative Free Bid of 2 Hearts (or 2 Diamonds in this example) may be employed. This understanding, however, affects the use of the Negative Double, since it is no longer needed for a hand that can make a Negative Free Bid, but it is required for a stronger hand that would normally make a forcing suit response at a minimum level. Therefore, a Negative Double followed by a new suit becomes forcing, promising a holding containing game values. The Negative Free Bid is not always necessary at the One Level and has questionable value at the Four Level, and therefore most partnership understandings include this feature only on the Two and Three Level.

Negative Freebids Article - An informative article written by Karen Walker in 1997. This information, not found on the website of Karen Walker, has only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference. Visitors are encouraged to visit her website, Prairienet.org, to read updated and expanded versions of Negative Freebids.

Negative Inference
This is information deduced from a player’s failure to take a specific or expected action in the auction or play.

Negative Response
A bid denying certain values. Artificial responses showing weakness.

Negative Slam Double
See: Double For Sacrifice. This action is also referred to as: Unpenalty Double or Positive Slam Double. In essence the negative slam double is a double of the slam contract bid by the opposing side after the partnership of the doubler has previously bid and responder has raised a suit (preemptively for an early sacrifice) to suggest a sacrifice against the slam contract of the opposing side. The negative slam double is made with no defensive values and/or tricks. The partner, by agreement, must sacrifice by bidding provided the partner can indeed defeat the slam contract by holding two defensive tricks. This information is communicated with a call of pass by the doubler's partner.

Nepal Bridge Association
Contact Address
Dasarath Sport Complex
Trepwreswore
Nepal
Telephone: 977-1-421-150
Facsimile: 977-1-437-133

Neither Side Vulnerable
A phrase to inform all players that neither side has scored a game.

Net Score
1. The net score is the result of a rubber of bridge or of Chicago after the score of the losing side is subtracted from the score of the winning side. In rounding off to the nearest 100 points, 50 points count as an extra 100 point in the United States, but this does not apply in England.
2. The net score applies also to team matches to designate the difference between the scores of two teams at the end of a session or a match.

Netherlands Antilles: Bridge Bond Nederlandse Antillen

Netherlands Bridge League - Nederlandse Bridge Bond
This Website takes you to the bridge players in the Netherlands or Holland. There are many bridge players in Holland, but this Website is constructed only for those who speak Dutch. This organization was founded in 1930 by Mr. A.J.E. Lucardie.

Neutral Card

1. A card played, that provides no signal or inference about the strength or distribution of the suit led.
2. A middling card in a suit preference situation is one example of a neutral card.
3. When the defenders know their own discarding system, then they will play neutral cards to avoid giving unnecessary information to the declarer.

Neutral Lead
A lead that neither threatens to develop tricks nor risks the loss of tricks; a lead, which is passive and provides no information to the opposing side.

Newcomer
This is a designation given to a new player, who is new to the game of bridge or who is new to the style of duplicate contract bridge. Other terms are: Newplicate - New-to-Duplicate - Novice.

Newcomer Game or Novice Game
This is the designation given to an event, that is restricted to players with fewer than 20 masterpoints or that can be altered to meet the circumstances of the event. It is designed to assist the new bridge player

Newcomer Pairs
A Newcomers Pairs, which is run along the lines of an open pairs, is for new players only. Usually the upper masterpoint limit is 5.

New Deal
A term which refers to a fresh deal to take the place of a misdeal or to replace a deal voided for any reason.

New England Relay
A form of movement at bridge tournaments and competitive events.

Newsland Moscito
This variation of the Moscito System is called the Newlands Moscito and was developed by Mr. Douglas A. Newlands and Mr. M. Willcox, and is based on the original Moscito System devised by Mr. Paul Marston and Mr. Stephen Burgess.

New Minor Forcing
Also known as Unbid Minor Suit Force. After the rebid by the opener of 1 No Trump, the responder sometimes finds it more advantageous to have a low-level forcing bid available, either to inquire further about opener’s support or to force the partner to describe his 1 No Trump rebid in further detail. Some partnerships use the 2 Club rebid by the responder as forcing. Some partnerships use the 2 Club rebid by the responder as Checkback Stayman. Some partnerships use the unbid minor suit as responder’s forcing call.

New Minor Forcing vs Checkback Stayman
This is an article written and contributed by Mr. Marvin French of San Diego, California, and which was published in the book Marvin's Conventions and Treatments written by Mr. Marvin French. It addresses the problem encountered by bridge players when confronted with a certain bidding sequence. This is a .pdf file and will automatically be opened by your browser.

Simplified New Minor Forcing
A variation of the original concept devised and contributed by Mr. Martin Gellman. The addition of Mr. Martin Gellman to the New Minor Forcing convention is presented due to the understanding of certain partnership agreements. The idea behind this simplified form is readily understood and should be made available to the bridge players, who use different interpretations of the auction to mean different things.

Hardy Adjunct to New Minor Forcing
The origin of this concept is unknown. When the partnership has agreed to employ the Hardy Adjunct after a New Minor Forcing bid by the responder, then the opener can further clarify his holding and shape or pattern.

Simplified New Minor Forcing
Devised by Mr. Martin Gellman. The addition of Mr. Martin Gellman to the New Minor Forcing convention is presented due to the understanding of certain partnership agreements. The idea behind this simplified form is readily understood and should be made available to the bridge players, who use different interpretations of the auction to mean different things.

Wittes Adjunct to New Minor Forcing
The origin of this treatment is unknown. When employing New Minor Forcing as the partnership agreement, the partnership may wish to show the quality of the opener's holding in the responder's Major suit.

News Groups
The Internet provides many ways of communication. News Groups, which are basically Bulletin Boards, have been created with special purposes for geographical areas, but all bridge players are welcome. Some News Groups are private, however, and this must be respected.

New South Wales Opening Bids
This is a variation of the Vienna System formerly used by Mr. Richard John Cummings, (aka Dick Cummings, born in the year 1932 and died in the year 1999), and Mr. Thomas Peter Seres, (aka Tim Seres, pictured below, born April 1, 1925 and died September 27, 2007), in collaboration with other Australian bridge experts. The system and the opening bids were amended and expanded by Mr. William K. A. Schaufelberger (aka Wil Schaufelberger, born 1902 and died 1972), and by Mr. Ronald D. Klinger, (aka Ron Klinger).

New South Wales System 1970
This conventional method was devised and developed by Mr. Richard John Cummings, (aka Dick Cummings), and Mr. Thomas Peter Seres, (aka Tim Seres), both of Sydney, Australia. The conventional method is employed by the responder following a No Trump opening by partner. The range of the No Trump opening bid is regarded as being strong with values between 15 and 18 points, and is a variation on the Stayman concept.

Nightmare Bidding System - Nightmare System - Nightmare
A form of a bidding system, compiled by Mr. Massimo Lanzarotti, Mr. Eric Kokish, Isabel Gallego, and Mr. João Fanha, and devised by teams from Italy for major bridge events beginning in the late 1990s, employed primarily by Mr. Massimo Lanzarotti and bridge partner Mr. Andrea Buratti in those bridge tournaments. This information has only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

New South Wales Control Responses
The original concept is designated as control showing responses (also step responses) to a strong, artificial 2 Clubs opening bid. These original responses should be viewed first and then the responses provided by the Australian System designated as New South Wales, and which is a variant of the Vienna System, devised and developed by Mr. Richard John Cummings (aka Dick) and Mr. Thomas Peter Seres (aka Tim) and other Australians.

Newspaper and Published Bridge Related Articles
This is a list of published bridge-related articles, which have appeared in newspaper print.

First Hand Printed in a Newspaper
This is a description in .pdf file format of the first ever printed bridge column in a magazine. The .pdf file will, depending on your browser, be automatically downloaded to your computer and opened with Adobe Acrobat or automatically opened by your browser.

A Planning Approach To Declarer Play In Contract Bridge, by S.J.J. Smith. Computer Science Department, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 29742; D.S. Nau, Computer Science Department, Institute for Systems Research, and Institute for Advanced Computer Studes, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 29742; T.A. Throop, Great Games Products (Bridge Baron), 8804 Chalon Drive, Bethesda, Maryland, 20817.

Recreation Specialization in the Social World of Contract Bridge, Journal article by Geoffrey Godbey, David Scott; Journal of Leisure Research, Vol. 26, 1994

Turning Tricks: The Rise and Fall of Contract Bridge, written by Mr. David Owen and published in The New Yorker in the issue of September 17, 2007.

Alfred Sheinwold

November 3, 1986

New Suit
A suit not previously bid.

New York-New Jersey Conference Regional Championships
This was a four-day, five-event bridge tournament contest annually from the year 1958 to 1969. The tournament was conducted in Asbury Park, New Jersey, United States, and during the following years at Grossinger's Hotel in Liberty, New York, United States. The five events contested were: Open Teams, Open Pairs, Men's Pairs, Women's Pairs, and Mixed Pairs.

 

New York Times, The
Many bridge articles have been published in The New York Times by many bridge players. One of the more famous bridge columnist was Mr. Alan Truscott, who column became famous worldwide. Other articles pertaining to the game of bridge have also appeared and several links are listed below.

April 5, 1995 - Bridge Pulls In the Young, Making Bids and Friends written by Jennifer Steinhauer.

Bring Bridge Back To The Table, by Sharon Osberg, The New York Times, November 27, 2005

New 2 No Trump Systems
Originated by both Mr. Adam Meyerson and Mr. Gregory (Greg) Humphreys and posted online with the date of May 26, 2004. This information has also only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

New Zealand Contract Bridge Association - This organization has existed for some years. The inaugural meeting was held on October 24, 1936. Four Bridge Clubs: Northern, Wellington, Crockfords and Otago were in existence. By 1949 the total membership was 463 and the levy was one Shilling per member.

New Zealand Bridge
This is the name of a bridge magazine printed and published in New Zealand. Initially it appeared five times a year, the first issue dated March 1965, with an annual subscription rate of 10 shillings, or 2/6 per copy. The original editor was Harold Fenton, assisted by Walter Linderman, Len McKillip and Jock Hutchison. The first issue included articles by Bruce Bell, John Wignall and George Peche. The first editorial contained the following: "Contact Bridge in this country has long needed a stimulus and it is our fervent desire that New Zealand Bridge will provide the necessary spur. Our object is to bring a closer harmony between the various bridge playing communities of New Zealand by exchanging viewpoints and becoming familiar with each other’s activities".

New Zealand Relay System
See: Symmetric Relay System

Newly Formed Tables
These tables can be formed with four to six bridge players according to precedence, and thus generally being established by order of entry into the playing room. Those bridge players leaving an existing table to cut into the new table have the lowest precedence.

Next Step For Kings
This is the designation for a partnership agreement, whereby a bid of the next step provided it is not the agreed trump suits, constitutes a request for the number of held Kings. This request mainly follows follows a response to an Ace-asking bid of 4 Clubs or 4 No Trump.

NIBU - This is the Home Page for the Northern Ireland Bridge Union which belongs to the confederation of the Contract Bridge Association of Ireland.

Niemeijer - This designation is used in The Netherlands for Puppet Stayman.

Nightmare Bidding System or Nightmare System or Nightmare
A form of a bidding system, compiled by Mr. Massimo Lanzarotti, Mr. Eric Kokish, Isabel Gallego, and Mr. João Fanha, and devised by teams from Italy for major bridge events beginning in the late 1990s, employed primarily by Mr. Massimo Lanzarotti and bridge partner Mr. Andrea Buratti in those bridge tournaments. This is a .pdf file.

According to Mr. Andrea Buratti, Nightmare is a collage of things already seen elsewhere, along with some totally original and compelling ideas. Rather simple but very dangerous, it has a powerful motor but many logical natural meanings to help you handle it in every situation.

According to Massimo Lanzarotti, Nightmare is a strategy, a philosophy, a way of approaching bridge that you will greatly enjoy.

An Internet publication of this bidding system has been posted in the English language, and can be found at the URL: http://bridge.school.org.cn/bridge/data/b/1114106659.pdf. This material is also only archived on this site in .pdf file format for future references. This material has been translated in English by Mr. Daniel J. Neill and formatted by Leah Newell, and dated March 24, 2005. The opening bids are presented below:

1 : Shows a balanced to semi-balanced shape with 15-17 points, or
shows an unbalanced shape with a 3-suited holding with Clubs and 15 plus points, or
shows a 6-card Club suit and a 5-any side suit; 11+ (16+ value) or
any game-forcing holding.
1 : Shows a balanced holding with 18-20 points or
shows an unbalanced holding with 4 plus Diamonds.
1 : Shows a 1/2 suiter with 5 plus Hearts; 11 plus points or
shows 11-14 points and a distribution of 4-4-4-1.
1 : Shows a 1/2 suiter with 5 plus Spades; 11 plus points.
1 NT: Shows 11-14 points.
2 : Shows 11-15 points with 5 plus Clubs; one or two-suited.
2 : Mulit: Weak with 5-9 points or
shows 21-23 points and balanced shape.
2 : Shows 6 plus Hearts; 8-12 points; possible 4-card side suit.
2 : Shows 6 plus Spades; 8-12 points; possible 4-card side suit.
2 NT: Shows 21-22 points, semi-balanced with 5 cards in Diamonds, Hearts, or Spades
3 : Shows a Diamond preempt or
a distribution of 6-5+ in Hearts and Spades; 5-11 points.
3 : Shows a Heart preempt or
a distribution of 6-5+ in Spades and unknown Minor; 5-11 points.
3 : Shows a Spade preempt or
a distribution of 6-5+ in Clubs and Diamonds; 5-11 points.
3 : Shows any solid suit without side tricks.
3 NT: Shows a solid Minor suit with a side stopper.
4 : Promises 8 tricks with Hearts as trumps; natural in 3rd seat.
4 : Promises 8 tricks with Spades as trumps; natural in 3rd seat.
4 : Natural Heart preempt.
4 : Natural Spade preempt.

Side Note: In an interview with Mr. Eric Rodwell in 2001, Mr. Glen Ashton of Bridgematters presented an overview of the opening bids, which is presented below, and which represents only the opening bids but no follow-up responses. These opening bids were based entirely on speculation and observation as soon as it became known that Mr. Massimo Lanzarotti and bridge partner Mr. Andrea Buratti intended on experimenting with a new bidding system. It is possible that several of the following opening bids were actually played and represent the original version before revision. This interview by Mr. Glen Ashton has only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for the purpose of future reference.

1 : 15-17 points with balanced distribution,
or 15+ points with 5+ Clubs,
or any 4-4-4-1 distribution with 4 Clubs 15+ points,
or any very strong hand (22/23+ points)
1 : 18-20 points with balanced distribution,
or 11-21 points with 5+ Diamonds,
or any 4-4-4-1 distribution with four Diamonds and 11-14 points,
or 4-4-4-1 distribution with exactly with 15-21 points
1 : 11-21 points, 5+ Hearts, if 5-3-3-2 shape then 15+ points. 
1 can also be 4-4-1-4 distribution with exactly 12-14 points
1 : 11-21 points, 5+ Spades, if 5-3-3-2 shape then 15+ points. 
1 can also be 4-4-1-4 distribution with exactly 12-14 points
1 NT: 11-14 points, 5-3-3-2 hands with a five card Major open 1 NT if 11-14 points
2 : 8-14 points, 5+ Clubs, if 8-10 usually a one-suiter
2 : Multi - 5-10 points with a weak two in a Major, or 21-22 balanced distribution
2 : 8/9-12 points, 6+ Hearts, can have another four card suit
2 : 8/9-12 points, 6+ Spades, can have another four card suit

Nilslandske slinkningar
The English designation of Nilsland Defense or the Swedish designation of Nilslandske slinkningar is a defense method against a double by the immediate opponent after a 1 No Trump opening, devised by Mr. Mats Nilsland of Sweden. This conventional method can be used after a 1 No Trump opening has been doubled or 1 No Trump overcall has been doubled.

Nine or Nine Spot
The card ranking sixth highest in any suit.

Nine Tables
At duplicate, nine tables provide for competition among 36 players as individuals, 18 pairs, or nine teams-of-four. It is similar to the movement of 8 tables except for the first round, and the Irregular Movement is strongly suggested. For pairs events, either the Mitchell, Three-Quarter Movement, or the Short Movement can be used.

-ninth
Within or heading a nine-card holding. For example: Jack-ninth shows nine cards headed by the Jack.

No Bid
Considered in the present stage of the game of bridge to be an improper verbal form of pass. However, it is standard practice in several English speaking countries and/or by international tournaments. This phrase, however, is subject to the warning against use of different designations for the same call. See Law 74C.

LAW 74 - CONDUCT AND ETIQUETTE
C. Violations of Procedure
The following are considered violations of procedure:
1. using different designations for the same call.
  Note: In the times when bidding boxes were not in use all bids and calls were accomplished verbally. The general term for pass was No Bid and the first opportunity to open with either a suit bid or No Trump bid passed to the next player in rotation. This verbal call or bid was also understood from the beginning stages of the evolution of the game to be also a means of transmitting or communicating information to partner by voice inflection, tone of voice, the loudness or softness of the bid or call, etc. Although considered a necessary evil, against which the bridge player had to protect himself from doing, such audible calls or bids always presented a problem for the sponsoring organizations and also for the on-floor directors.

No Call
Considered an improper verbal form of pass and a misnomer as well, because each player must call at his or her turn, even if that call is a pass.

No Name
See: Weak Opening Systems

Nonforcing
A term to describe allowing partner to pass under the partnership understanding. A bid which does not require a response from the partner.

Non-Forcing Sequences
A sequence which permits either member of the partnership to cease the bidding. Before passing, however, the partner should be satisfied that a game contract is unlikely, and that he is unable to convert to a superior partscore.

Non-Jump Cuebid Overcalls - Double Jump Cuebid Overcalls - Jump Cuebid Overcalls
The origin of this defense method is unknown. The method considers 1. the Non-Jump Cuebid Overcall, 2. the Jump Cuebid Overcall, and 3. the Double Jump Cuebid Overcall to communicate that the holding is one-suited and that this suit is a solid to semi-solid suit. Also known as Andersen's Cuebid.

Non-Forcing Stayman - Forcing Stayman - Two Way Stayman
The concepts of the non-forcing Stayman principle and the forcing Stayman principle are presented. Theforcing Stayman principle was introduced following the popularity of the Precision bidding systems and all variations thereof. The reason is that such bidding systems allow No Trump ranges between 10 points and 15 points. Disallowed by sponsoring organizations, however, are transfer bids following a No Trump bid with this range.

Non-Master Pairs
A Non-Masters Pairs is usually run in conjunction with a Master Pairs. An arbitrary upper limit of masterpoints is set, and both members of every pair must have that number of masterpoints or fewer. The game itself is run along the lines of an open pairs.

Nonmaterial Squeezes
Nonmaterial squeezes are squeezes against strategic values, rather than against material values, such as winners or guards to winners.

Nonserious
An adjective used to designate a mild slam try.

Non-Serious 3 No Trump
This is a conventional method, whereby the bid of 3 No Trump by one partner in an uncontested auction shows additional strength, and when 3 No Trump is not bid by one partner, then this action communicates the information that no special interest in attempting a slam contract. Authored by Mr. Ray Green of the Brunton Bridge Club located in Gosforth, Newcastle upon Tyne, England. This information has also only been preserved and archived on this site in .pdf file format for future reference.

Non-Vulnerable
The condition of a side that has not won a game in a rubber of bridge. In duplicate, deals or boards are marked according to the vulnerability, either both not vulnerable, both vulnerable, or one pair vulnerable.

Nordic Championships
These events were first organized in 1946 by the delegates from the Bridge Federations of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. These events represented one of the first post-war efforts to revitalize international bridge competition in Europe. The events were held on an annual basis until 1949. In this year Iceland joined the competition. After the re-introduction of the European Championships, the popularity of the Nordic Championships became less, and the event is now a biennial competition. Between 1959 and 1962 there were no events.

Normal Expectancy
The holding in either high cards or the distribution which a partner may expect from partner after opening the auction. If the partner is an unpassed hand, the expectancy is one-third of the missing high cards or high card points, and one-third of the remaining cards in the suit.

Norman Convention
This slam bidding method was devised and originated with Mr. Norman de Villiers Hart and Sir Norman Bennett. This method evolved during the early pioneer days of the game of organized bridge. This particular method was incorporated into the Vienna Bidding System. The conventional method is also known as the Norman Four No Trump method.

North
1. one of the compass points;
2. one of the four players, usually the dummy, in the standard diagram representing all four bridge hands.

North American Championship
The awards in major events at the three principal tournaments of the American Contract Bridge League, which encompasses the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Bermuda. Before 1975, these tournaments were known as the National Tournaments.

North American Bridge Championships
This is the designation given in 1975 to the three American Contract Bridge League Championship tournaments held annually for North America, and were formerly known as the Nationals.

North American Forty-Niner Pairs
When first established in 1979, this event was known as the Grand National Rookie Pairs. But in 1984, this event became the North American Rookie Pairs. And in 1991, this event became the North American Forty-Niner Pairs. This event is open to all ACBL members with fewer than 50 masterpoints.

North American Pairs
Commonly known as the NAP and which was formerly conducted as the Grand National Pairs. This event is a major ACBL championship which is staged in qualifying rounds at the club, unit and district levels. It culminates in a final held in conjunction with the Spring NABC and is run as a flighted event.

Northern Ireland Bridge Union - The NIBU is part of the confederation of the Contract Bridge Association of Ireland and the Irish Bridge Union.

North-South
One of the competing partnerships; the declaring side in the standard diagram.

Norway Drury
This variation of the Drury conventional method is played in Norway. It is different from other variations in that a distinction is made between the opening of 1 Heart and 1 Spade as are the continuances.

Norwegian
In many partnership agreements and employing certain carding systems a low-high signal shows an odd number of cards in that particular suit and a high-low signal shows an even number of cards in that particular suit. This is agreed upon to show count. Norwegian is a slang designation used in Norway to signify a carding system showing count. If the high-low signal shows and even count and the low-high signal shows an odd count, then this agreement is referred to as a Norwegian. It the high-low signal shows an odd count and the low-high signal shows an even count, then this is referred to as a Swedish.

Norwegian Bridge Federation - Norsk Bridgeforbund
This Federation was founded in 1932.

Norwegian 2 Diamonds
The 2 Diamond opening showing a weak hand with both Majors is known as Ekrens or Norwegian 2 Diamonds. It seems though that it was invented in Poland in the 1970's (and later, independently, by Mr. Bjoern Ekren).

No Trump
A denomination in which a player may bid at bridge events. No Trump is the ranking denomination during any auction, ranking higher than Spades.

No Trump Defense Methods - No Trump Defense Agreements - NT Defense Method
This is a list of possible methods, treatments, approaches, conventions to employ after an opponent has opened the auction with 1 No Trump, and sometimes 2 No Trump. There are many different methods and this list is not complete.

No Trump Distribution
A hand distribution suited to No Trump play rather than a suit because of its balanced pattern. The distribution may be 4-3-3-3, 4-4-3-2, 5-4-2-2, 6-3-2-2. There have been many definitions in the past, but the most modern is that the holding should have no void, no singleton, and may have only one doubleton headed by a top tenace.

No Trump Forcing System, The
This is a designation given to a conventional method presumably developed and authored by Mr. Walter Loper in his publication titled The No Trump Forcing System, published privately in the year 1932 in New York, New York, United States. Any additional information would be greatly appreciated.

No Trump For Takeout
A designation for a feature in a variation of the Fishbein conventional method. See: Fishbein Convention.

No Trump Ladders
A No Trump Ladder is the structure of how balanced hands of a given range are communicated to partner. One principle advanced in the Romex Bidding system is that an opening bid or opener's rebid of 2 No Trump promises a balanced holding, which should have a range of no more than 2 high card points. This structure is illustrated in the three No Trump Ladders, which follow. The first No Trump Ladder is the Romex No Trump Ladder, as presented in the publications: Bid To Win by Mr. Peter Dixon and Godfrey's Bridge Challenge by Mr. George Rosenkranz and Mr. Phillip Alder:

High Card Points Opening Rebid
12-16 high card points Open 1 Minor suit Rebid 1 No Trump
17-18 high card points Open 1 Minor suit Rebid 2 No Trump
19-20 high card points Open 1 No Trump Rebid 2 No Trump
21-22 high card points Open 2 Diamonds Rebid 2 No Trump
23-24 high card points Open 2 Clubs Rebid 2 No Trump
25-26 high card points Open 2 No Trump
27-28 high card points Open 2 Diamonds Jump in No Trump
29-30 high card points Open 2 Clubs Jump in No Trump

The second No Trump Ladder is the No Trump Ladder, as presented in the publication: Stairway To The Stars by Mr. George Rosenkranz:

High Card Points Opening Rebid
10-12 high card points Open 1 No Trump
13-16 high card points Open 1 Diamond Rebid 1 No Trump
17-20 high card points Open 1 Club Rebid 1 No Trump
21-22 high card points Open 2 Diamonds Rebid 2 No Trump
23-24 high card points Open 1 Club Rebid 2 No Trump
25-26 high card points Open 1 Club Rebid 2 Hearts (Kokish Relay)
27-28 high card points Open 2 Diamonds Jump in No Trump
29 plus high card points Open 1 Club Rebid 2 Hearts

The third No Trump Ladder is the No Trump Ladder for Standard Acol:

High Card Points Opening Rebid
12-14 high card points Open 1 No Trump
15-16 high card points Open 1 of a suit Rebid No Trump at the cheapest level
17-18 high card points Open 1 of a suit Jump rebid in No Trump
19-20 high card points Open 1 of a suit Double jump rebid in No Trump
21-22 high card points Open 2 No Trump
23-24 high card points Open 2 Clubs Rebid No Trump at the cheapest level
Extension:
25-26 high card points Open 2 Clubs Jump rebid in No Trump
27-28 high card points Open 2 Clubs Double jump rebid in No Trump

No Trump Response Methods
The concept of a No Trump opening bid changed forever the game of bridge since the very first bid by a bridge player limited the holding not only to a certain pre-determined number of values, but also to a pre-determined and agreed upon distribution. The bridge player, who made such an opening bid, had with this one particular bid limited the holding and the partner of the No Trump bidder became the captain of the partnership.

Nottingham Club Opening Bids
This is a system which was popular in the English Midlands during the 1930s. Its popularity remained until around the end of the 1960s, and competed strongly in England for favor by bridge players against the Acol bidding system. The origin is reputedly to be by The Nottingham Bridge Club and revised by Mr. L. William Simpson. The system, after gaining popularity, was revised and privately published in the 1950s and titled: The Revised Nottingham Club Bridge Bidding System, authored by Mr. L. William Simpson, born 1909. Margery Burns' original book, The Nottingham System of Contract Bridge, was eventually published in 1954.

Not Through The Iron Duke
This is a verbal expression, dating from Whist, meaning that a player is covering one card with a higher one, the implication being that an opponent can not get his card through without a higher one being played, and is usually applied to finessing positions.

Not Vulnerable
The condition of a side that has not won a game in a rubber of bridge. In duplicate, deals or boards are marked according to the vulnerability, either both not vulnerable, both vulnerable, or one pair vulnerable.

Novice
Designation for a new or inexperienced bridge player. According to the ACBL, a player with less than 20 masterpoints.

Novice Games
Events which help promote duplicate bridge among the less experienced players, and which help in increasing the membership in duplicate clubs and the ACBL.

Novice Pairs
Only new and inexperienced players are eligible to play in the Novice Pairs. Usually there is an upper masterpoint limit. Often this limit is 5 or 10 matchpoints, but it could be 20 or even 50.

NPC
A term to describe the Non-Playing Captain of a bridge team.

Nuisance Bid
An action during the auction aimed at disrupting the opponents' auction.

Nullo, Game of
A game of bridge with 52 cards with an objective similar to the feature of the game of Solo Whist with its bid of misére, which is to bid a contract and take zero tricks, or null tricks. The definition of null is, when it refers to mathematics is: Of or relating to a set having no members or to zero magnitude. This form of the game was introduced in 1917. The origin is unknown. A bridge player holding a complete and absolute Yarborough could actually enter the auction and compete to a high level, even including the seven level. A Nullo bid out-ranked Spades as the highest-ranking suit but No Trump out-ranked Nullo. The scoring methods were various but adhered mostly to the scoring methods of the time. The popularity of this form of the game was more of a passing fancy since the average bridge player had more of a mentality of winning tricks rather than losing tricks intentionally, and the game passed into history.

Number
For example: Going for a Number. A number generally represents a loss, because this number could exceed the value of the score the opponents could have obtained by declaring the contract plus any bonuses.

Number One
Slang: an expression to designate the Ace.

Nusine Club Opening Bids
These opening bids were devised and developed by Mr. Knut Blakset and his older brother Mr. Lars Blakset of Denmark. Perhaps in a humorous moment they decided to name these opening bids after Knut's cat, which was / is named Nusine.

Nyon System
This is the designation given to a bidding system developed by Walter-Latinov. The link brings the visitor to the Website of Mr. Walter. These files have been preserved and archived only on this site in the form of .pdf files, which are listed below and have been only preserved and archived on this site for future reference.

1 /: Natural, best Minor (Club if 4333 / 3433)   1 /: Natural, 5+ Cards Suit
Other Advancer Rebids   1 NT: 15-17, Balanced
2 : Strong Multi   2 : Game Forcing
2 NT: 22-23 HCP, Balanced   Checkback Stayman
Opponents Interfere Over our 1 NT Opening   2 /: Weak

Defense against:

Strong Artificial Openings   Natural Openings   Balanced No Trump Openings
Special Openings   Pre-emptive Openings   Low Competitive
Mid Competitive   High Competitive   Negative Doubles
Other Doubles   Special Cue-bids   Slam Conventions
Carding        

 


 

 


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